Blog News

March 26, 2014

Blood in the litter box

Cats pass blood in the urine for many different reasons. Older cats with kidney or bladder disease are prone to urinary tract infections. In younger cats it can be a sign of stress or anxiety. If a male cat is having trouble passing his urine or is passing blood it is an emergency and you should call us immediately. A urine sample and a chat with the person who spends the most time with the cat is essential to working out what the root cause of the problem is. Often we take the sample in the consult room. Sometimes the cat has to stay in hospital (like Leila above) until she builds up enough urine for us to sample. Once we have the urine we check it with a diagnostic stick and then stain it so we can see any cells, crystals or bacteria under the microscope. We can then target the problem with the best treatment and help you prevent it happening again.
March 23, 2014
old grumpy cat

Kitty on speed

Sometimes cats get more active and hyper as they get older - rushing up trees, attacking long term doggy and feline friends, resenting handling and generally being jumpy. If this is coupled with a big appetite and weight loss then we become suspicious of an overactive thyroid. Early detection and treatment prevents the more serious effects of hyperthyroidism. The overproduction of the thyroid hormone puts the whole body into overdrive. The heart beats more rapidly and can go out of rhythm. The kidneys and liver work harder causing increased thirst and urination. A busy stomach and intestine may produce vomiting and diarrhoea or accidents outside the litter box. Severely affected cats pant and neglect their grooming. Several treatment options are available. There's sure to be one that suits your cat and household situation.
March 20, 2014

Returning from the vet…

Do you dread bringing one of your cats home from the vet? Sometimes the return provokes world war 3 between the returnee and those that have stayed home... The three cats in my house usually adore each other, grooming and sleeping together most of the day. If one had to go to hospital the other two cats would sniff the patient and then hiss and spit at her when we returned. I thought they were reacting to the smell of the hospital or of strange humans and animals. However a recent article says that it is the sudden return of a group member that puts them offside. In the wild when a cat returns to the colony after a solo meal they hang round on the margins and almost sneak back in when no one is looking. No matter how many times in the day she returns, the group seems to debate whether to accept her back each time. When I came home from the hospital with a patient, I would plonk her back in the middle of the group and let her out with a fanfare, hoping they would be nice to her if we pushed our way in. Now I leave her outside and see what the other two are up to. If they are asleep on the bed I sneak the patient into the lounge room, let her out and quickly take the carrier away. If they are up and about I feed them in the laundry and while they are distracted I bring the patient in to the bedroom and let her decide on the best course of action. Abrupt re-entries are not de rigueur in feline circles. They prefer the more subtle return.