Blog News

March 1, 2018

Kitten deaths in Canberra

Panleukopenia, also known as Feline Enteritis, has swept through the homeless and rescued kitten population of Canberra in the last month. Kittens died from dehydration due to vomiting and diarrhoea, and massive secondary infection. Aggressive support with intravenous fluids and broad spectrum antibiotics helped some but a high proportion of affected cats died. Infection with the parvovirus which causes Panleukopenia is highly preventable. Mass vaccination prevents outbreaks. When less than 70 per cent of the population is vaccinated, the situation is perfect for the emergence of a disease epidemic. The current outbreak is a timely reminder that maintaining immunity in populations of animals with effective vaccines is essential. The usual F3 vaccine is highly effective in protecting against Panleukopenia. If you are unsure of your cats' vaccination status please phone us on 6251 1444 and we will check our records for you. Cats less than 12 months of age are most vulnerable and must have had an F3 booster after 16 weeks of age to be fully protected.
February 14, 2018

Calicivirus outbreak

A virulent and atypical form of calicivirus has infected some cats in Canberra. Only 2 other outbreaks have ever occurred in Australia - in Sydney and in Ipswich, Queensland. Vaccination against the usual strains of calicivirus does not seem to protect cats Affected cats go off their food, seem lame or sore, and hide. Most get over it with pain medication and TLC. Some go onto develop swollen noses, faces and paws, and need intensive care. If you suspect your cat is ill please phone us before coming down and then when you arrive. To protect your cat from becoming infected wash your hands for at least 30 seconds when you get home from anywhere and before touching your cat. We have instituted very strict disinfection procedures at Canberra Cat Vet. Do not be offended if we ask you to be a lot more careful with carriers, and in touching anything at the hospital! We have your cats' health as our top priority.
January 18, 2018

Diabetes in cats

Diabetes mellitus in cats is much the same as type 2 diabetes in humans - overweight, sedentary individuals are most at risk. Cleo came to see us for her annual check a few months ago and we were concerned to find that she had shed nearly a kilo since we had last met. That's 10% of her bodyweight! Her carers told us that her appetite was greater than ever and they'd noticed that she was up at the sink looking for water much more often. Burmese are more at risk for diabetes than other breeds so we were immediately suspicious that Cleo had developed diabetes. Because we were anxious to confirm our suspicions and to rule out other diseases we ran her blood tests in our lab at Canberra Cat Vet. While her kidneys, liver, blood count and electrolytes were normal her blood glucose was high. She also had a urinary tract infection, which is very common in cats with diabetes because bacteria thrive in the sugary urine. Cleo started on insulin that night. Although her carers had never given injections before they were soon experts. They waited until she was eating her special high protein diet and slipped the tiny needle under her skin. Cleo didn't bat an eyelid. Once they were all in the routine and the urinary infection had cleared we retested her blood glucose levels and adjusted the dose. If diabetes in cats is caught early and the diet adjusted many go into remission. The remission is more durable if the cat is back to a healthy lean weight.