Blog News

October 3, 2017

Information night October 19th

Our information night this year centres on how cats perceive the world - and how you can harness this when integrating your kitten or cat into your household. Secure your place at our popular annual information night. Phone us on 6251 1444 or email us as soon as possible.
September 28, 2017

Does my cat need worming?

All cats are exposed to roundworm sometime in their lives. Queens pass the larvae to their kittens in the milk and cats who hunt - and let's face it all cats are hunters - ingest them in that delicious worm, snail or mouse. Tapeworm is also found in hunters and also in cats who are fed raw meat. The flea tapeworm is the most common worm in Australian cats. Cats ingest tapeworm infected fleas during grooming. At Canberra Cat Vet we recommend deworming of all cats, even if confined indoors, every 3 months and effective flea control if fleas have been found on your cat or in its environment. Profender is an easy to apply spot-on worm control. If your cat also has fleas then Revolution or Advocate treat both fleas and worms. Milbemax is a very small worm tablet that many people find easy to administer. Canberra Cat Vet carries Activyl and Advantage, both excellent flea control spot-ons. We also have Seresto, a new flea control collar that keeps flea numbers down for 8 months.
September 21, 2017

Paralysis ticks in Canberra

A paralysis tick Already this year our sister clinic, Hall Vet Surgery, and the Canberra Veterinary Emergency Centre have treated pets with tick paralysis. Several of these pets have not been to the coast and neither have their owners. Please check your outdoor cats every day by running your fingers through their fur, checking in their ears, armpits, around their faces and under their tails for ticks. We have other types of ticks in our region too. If you find a tick and are not sure whether it is a paralysis tick or not bring it in for identification. Prevention is much better than cure, especially where ticks are concerned. We recommend Frontline spray, but also suggest Seresto collars, which coastal vets recommend. Watch this video for the signs of tick envenomation.