Blog News

May 4, 2017
Old cat resting

Old cats need extra care

Our cats don't give us much warning when they are not healthy. They hide arthritis until they can barely move. Kidney, gut and liver disease creep up on them. Hypertension is a silent killer, just as in humans. As our cats age they need more frequent assessments and a deeper probe into their health. We have a package for cats older than 10 years which picks up the major and most common disease threats. Canberra Cat Vet is offering NEW CLIENTS with a cat 10 years or older, and clients with cats who have just reached 10 years of age $15 OFF your next bag of Hills dry cat food! This offer is available until the end of June 2017 when you book in a Senior Health Check for your senior feline companion. A Senior Health Check for your cat may include, but is not limited to the following: full clinical examination, vaccination review, dental assessment, diet assessment, medication review, blood testing, urine examination, blood pressure and mobility assessments. Your cats health and happiness depend on regular veterinary assessments. Call us on 6251 1444 or make an online appointment on the "Request an Appointment" button above.
March 2, 2017

Enteritis outbreak – check your cats’ vaccination record

Since the 1970’s, vigilant use of feline core vaccines has resulted in strong herd immunity against feline enteritis (FPV), also known as panleukopaenia, caused by a parvovirus. Cases of the virus, which causes fevers, vomiting and dreadful diarrhoea, were almost unheard of. However, there has been a re-emergence of the potentially fatal enteritis over the last few years, with three outbreaks in Victoria between 2013 and 2015 claiming the lives of around 200 cats. Over the last month, shelter-based outbreaks of the disease have been reported in both New South Wales and Queensland, including Blacktown Pound in Sydney’s west. At another shelter the infection claimed the lives of five out of seven cats in one litter, before the virus was identified, enabling appropriate treatment of the other two kittens. The most common form of FPV is the acute form, which presents as a three to four day history of fever, depression and anorexia, progressing to vomiting and diarrhoea. Severe clinical illness leading to mortality is much more common in young, inadequately vaccinated kittens three to five months of age. The key to disease control is still mass vaccination. “Disease in cats is caused by parvoviruses, small DNA viruses. The main one is feline panleucopenia virus but parvoviruses that infect dogs can also cause the disease in cats” Professor Vanessa Barrs, Specialist in Feline Medicine told media publications. When less than 70 per cent of the population is vaccinated, the situation is perfect for the emergence of a disease epidemic, she said. The current outbreak is a timely reminder that maintaining immunity in populations of animals where effective vaccines are available is essential. If you are unsure of your cats' vaccination status please phone us on 6251 1444 and we will check our records for you. Cats less than 12 months of age are most vulnerable and must have had an F3 booster after 12 weeks of age to be fully protected.
February 13, 2017

Time to say goodbye?

Last week we had to make a hard decision for our much loved clinic cat Oliver. He had multiple problems - diabetes, hyperthyroidism, kidney disease, inflammatory bowel disease - and despite our best efforts was fading away to nothing. He has lived at Canberra Cat Vet since almost the day we opened as his owner went into hospital and passed away while he was staying with us. For the last year he has been faithfully medicated and cared for by his staff. However, we discovered that he had a liver mass recently and although he was still as bright as a button and ordering us around as usual, he lost weight rapidly. His kidneys were also deteriorating and he required fluids under the skin every second day - which he hated. Some days he ate well and some days he didn't. Some days he came out of his office to check the hospital was running smoothly and others he stayed on his bed(s) all day. His litter tray was a mess some days and empty others. Just as we would decide that he wasn't enjoying life he would spark up again. We had to ask ourselves the hard questions: Was he having more good days than bad? Was his appetite stable and was he enjoying his meals? Was he responding to us and his surroundings as much as he had just a few months before? Would he tolerate yet more treatment for his kidney disease? Was he staying in his familiar places or moving to unusual places - or was he not moving a lot at all? Was he crying a lot - or quieter than normal? Was he using the litterbox, missing it or soiling his beds? Was he losing weight more rapidly than expected in an elderly cat? How much enjoyment was he really getting out of life? The clincher for Ollie was the regular kidney treatment - he hated being interfered with at the best of times. And he had lost over a kilogram of weight in the last 6 months, despite Nurse Leanne's intensive feeding regime. All of his staff eventually agreed that it was time for Ollie to go. We gathered around him on his favourite bed, and purring loudly, he slid off into a happier hunting ground.