Blog News

January 19, 2017

The unwell cat

Cats often don't give us many clues that they are ill. Perhaps they miss a meal or hide in the cupboard. Perhaps they look for a cuddle; or perhaps they want nothing to do with you. Some will vomit or have diarrhoea. The occasional one will show pain by hunching over or curling up and wanting to be left alone. Many of these vaguely ill cats have pancreatitis, a painful inflammation of the pancreas. The pain and nausea put them off their food. As cats obtain most of their fluids through their food rather than from what they drink they become dehydrated very quickly. The dehydration exacerbates the pain and nausea and so a vicious downward spiral continues. Fortunately most respond to a drip to rehydrate them, and pain relief and anti-nausea medication. Within 2 or 3 days they are back to their normal selves. Pancreatitis is a very common complaint in middle-aged to older cats. If your cat doesn't seem to be her or himself call us sooner rather than later as cats often suffer pancreatitis silently.
January 5, 2017

Online appointment booking

This week we launched an online booking system. You can make an appointment with us on your mobile, tablet or computer. Look at the top of our webpage for the "Request An Appointment" button. You will find it right under the address and hours. Once you click on it you will be taken to a registration page. You will only have to register once. Choose the type of appointment you want and the time most convenient to you. You will then receive an email. Please continue to call us on 6251 1444 if your cat is ill and needs to be seen on the same day or if you are not sure how urgent your cat's problem is. Cats are very good at hiding how sick they are so if you have any doubts please discuss it with us on the phone.
December 30, 2016

New Year’s Eve terrors

New Year's Eve is a time of anxiety for many cats. Flashing lights, crashing and clapping fireworks send them into the cupboard or over the fence. With just a few practical changes at home around the time of fireworks, your cat should feel much more calm and relaxed. Here are 10 top tips to ensure your cat's New Year's Eve doesn't go off with a bang: If your cat hides on top of cupboards or under furniture, leave him alone and do not try to coax him out. This 'bolthole' is where he will feel most secure. It is important that your pet can access his favourite bolthole at all times On New Year's Eve, make sure your cat is safely inside and the doors, windows and cat flaps are closed. Plug a Feliway diffuser in the room where the cat spends most of his time 48 hours before the festivities begin. Make sure your cat is microchipped so that if he escapes he can be easily identified and returned to you. Provide your cat with a litter tray Draw the curtains to reduce noise from outside and play music or have the TV on to mask the noise of fireworks Ignore any fearful behaviour and do not try to comfort your cat. More importantly, do not try to pick him up or restrain him. Fearful cats prefer to be left to cope on their own. Try not to go out during the fireworks. . Stay calm and act normally In multi-cat households intercat tensions may rise. Feliway and multiple hiding places will help avoid disharmony If you are worried that your cat is taking a long time to recover from the festivities call us.