Blog News

December 18, 2014
ginger cat

Canberra Cat Vet’s Holiday Opening Hours

Christmas Eve: 8.30am - 2.30pm Christmas Day: Closed Boxing Day: Closed 27th December: 8.30am - 12.30pm 28th December (Sunday): Closed 29th December: 8.30am - 5.30pm 30th December: 8.30am - 5.30pm 31st December: 8.30am - 5.30pm New Year's Day: Closed If you have an emergency and we are closed, phone the Animal Emergency Centre on 6280 6344 Merry Christmas from Ollie and all at Canberra Cat Vet!
October 26, 2014

Thiamine deficiency in cats

When we read about recent cases of thiamine deficiency in cats fed preserved pet meats in Sydney we also found this American report about thiamine deficiency in cats fed uncooked fish and some pate type can foods. Thiamine is essential for carbohydrate metabolism, muscle contraction, and nerve conduction. Very little thiamine is stored in the body and cats depend on a steady dietary source of the vitamin. Thiamine is naturally found in many food sources such as whole grain cereals, nuts, legumes, brewer’s yeast, but cats derive thiamine mainly from meat products, in particular skeletal muscle, liver, heart, and kidneys. Improper food storage and processing, consumption of uncooked fish that contain the enzyme thiaminase, and consumption of diets with sulfur dioxide or sulfite meat preservatives can lead to insufficient dietary thiamine. After two to four weeks of a thiamine deficient diet, cats exhibit salivation, anorexia (loss of appetite), and sometimes vomiting. If the deficiency is not corrected, then dilated pupils, bradycardia (slow heart rate), aggression, and progressive neurological symptoms such as ataxia (loss of coordination), rigid head and neck ventroflexion, twitching, loss of righting reflexes, seizures, coma, and death will ensue. Rigid head and neck ventroflexion is the most common clinical sign in cats presented to veterinarians. (Winn Feline Foundation)
October 22, 2014

Permethrin flea products toxic to cats

Fleas are out and about again with the warmer weather. Be sure to only use a cat flea product on your cat. Dog flea products containing permethrin can be fatal if applied to cats even in small amounts. It is vital that dog flea products are not applied to cats. In fact it is better that flea products with permethrin in them are not used on dogs who live with cats. A treated dog only has to brush against a cat to poison her. Last summer we saw Smokey cat who sleeps nestled against the family dog, Jessie. Last year Jessie was treated with a permethrin flea and tick product before going down the coast for holidays. Some hours later Smokey started frothing at the mouth, vomiting and twitching. She was whisked off to us and spent several days in intensive care. Next time the family will use a tick prevention product like Frontline or Frontera on Jessie that is safe for cats as well. They only use products intended for cats, like Activyl, Advantage, Comfortis or Revolution, on Smokey.