Blog News

May 2, 2014

Training your asthmatic cat to the Aerokat

The dust over summer and then the flowering grasses this autumn have exacerbated the symptoms of many asthmatic cats. Coughing and wheezing are the main signs of asthma in cats, and sometimes a strong bronchospasm causes breathing distress, anxiety and occasionally death. Cats with asthma squat with their necks extended and their elbows out and cough. They are not bringing up a hairball. They are trying to breathe through narrowed airways. This is what a moderately asthmatic cat looks like: If asthma is not treated the lung becomes more and more inflamed and infection is likely. A bad attack can cause death. Cortisone in the form of tablet initially and through an inhaler/spacer like the Aerokat eventually is the foundation of asthma treatment in the cat. Some cats also need a drug like Ventolin to open up the airways. Many videos on giving your cat the Aerokat are available on the internet. This is one we liked with a more subtle asthma attack: Training your cat to the Aerokat requires patience and a sense of humour...
April 30, 2014

Grass eaters

Even though cats are obligate carnivores and don't usually volunteer to eat fruit or vegetables, they do like to eat grass. Eating grass is a normal behaviour in cats yet not fully understood – the general understanding is that it helps to move food or hairballs through the digestive tract (either up or down as grass eating often results in vomiting). It may also provide them with essential trace elements in their diet, so it is recommended that cats without access to grass outside are provided with a source indoors. This can be a commercial pack of 'cat grass' or a pot in which grass seeds or grass from the garden can be grown. Indoor cats without access to grass may chew other potted plants they would usually ignore or avoid and which may be poisonous. Make sure you don't have any lilies in pots or vases in your home. More information on Poisonous plants available here.
April 28, 2014

How to keep those kilos off…

Cats lose weight mainly by reduced food intake, but increased physical activity (even in cats!) is also of crucial importance. Earlier this month we discussed organising your cat's environment to promote weight loss. Researchers from the University of Ilinois have also found that increasing the frequency of meals per day (while still keeping portions small) and adding water to those meals also promoted more physical activity in cats.