Blog News

January 9, 2020

Laser pointers – harm or good?

Cats and laser pointers. Name a more iconic duo. Unfortunately for our feline friends, laser pointers are often used in potentially harmful ways.The problem with laser pointers is that they lack an endpoint. Nothing is ever physically caught. Even if the cat is “successful,” there's no reward. Such pointless play can cause some cats to develop a compulsive disorder. Instead of engaging in normal activities like playing with their owners or even eating, these cats will spend a large portion of their day chasing things that are similar to the laser pointer light, such as shadows or reflections. But that doesn't mean you need to stop using laser pointers.They're great for exercising cats and giving them the predatory stimulation they need. Use it in a way that's more effective by adding a clicker. Here's how it works: The cat is trained to associate the sound of the clicker with pleasing its owner and with the promise of a tangible reward. Once it's clicker trained, the cat is periodically allowed to “catch” the laser light, at which point the owner delivers a click followed by a tasty treat. In this way, the cat knows that it's won and that something good is coming.
November 14, 2019
cat drinking from kitchen sink

Dry Cats

Cats are adapted to desert environments. In the desert their fluids come from their foods so they have evolved with a poor drive to drink and inferior drinking techniques and equipment. Fresh prey contains 60-70% water and hunting cats do not naturally drink water. You may have noticed that your cat often misses the surface of the water in the bowl at first pass. As predators, cats' eyes are designed to focus at a distance of at least 25cm so it's difficult for them to focus on the water surface. Many cats gauge the surface by looking at the far side of the bowl. Many prefer to lap from a tap or off the shower floor. Cats are very inefficient at lapping fluids of low viscosity, such as water, because unlike other animals that create suction in their mouths, they must rely on their tongues to pull a column of water into their mouths. They only take in 3/100 of a teaspoon with each lap. To top it all off cats are afraid of attack from predators and would prefer not to have to crouch at the waterhole to take in their fluids. What can we do to prevent chronic dehydration and the dangers of kidney disease and bladder stones, especially in older cats? Feeding a high proportion of wet food - meat, cans or pouches - is the easiest solution. Providing fresh water in a private, quiet place every day and responding to their preference for moving water or water on large surfaces will also help. Avoid a solely dry diet at all costs.
November 13, 2019

Canberra Cat Vet wins local business award

Canberra Cat Vet was greatly honoured to win the Local Business Award for Outstanding Pet Care last night. A big thank you to all our wonderful clients for your nomination for the award and your trust and support over the last 6 years. We love working with you to optimise the health and well-being of your feline family.