Blog News

February 14, 2019

Sore eyes?

Poor Mali has cat flu, very common in young kittens when they face a new home, new people, and travel. Stress later in life may bring on another bout - or it may not. Herpesvirus, one of the causes of cat flu, hides in the nerve root behind the eye and comes out when kittens and some older cats are stressed. In mild cases, and particularly when the cat has been vaccinated, they only suffer a few days of a watery eye and sadness. In severe cases the virus causes ulcers on the eye and occasionally loss of the eye. The eye is squeezed closed and the discharge thickens. The cat may go off her food and hide. Whether the bout of flu is mild or severe the kitten or cat needs treatment. The eye is painful and the virus makes them feel unwell. Fight wounds, Chlamydia and Mycoplasma infections, and trauma also cause sore eyes in cats. Any eye disease must be treated promptly to avoid loss of sight or the eye. We prescribed lubrication drops for Mali's eyes, pain relief and an antibiotic because we suspected a Chlamydial as well as herpesvirus infection. If he has another bout we will consider an antiviral drug as well.
January 18, 2019

Can you help with a Cat Nutrition study?

Can you help? Can you help support a student at the Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, Edinburgh, with the aim of completing a research project into feline nutrition? It is hoped that the results obtained through this survey will help to advise pet food manufacturers, veterinarians and owners on better care of cats. The survey is open to all cat owners over the age of 18. There are 30 questions about feline nutrition and we estimate it should take you 15 minutes to complete. Click here to access the survey Anonymous data acquired from this study will be held in the USA, subject to US data protection laws, but will only be analysed by vet professionals and the Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies at the University of Edinburgh. By completing and submitting this questionnaire, you give permission for the data to be used for research and publication. The identity of individual responses will remain anonymous throughout data analysis and no data will be passed onto third parties. The survey engine collects IP addresses under GPDR, however the researchers will not have access to these.
December 12, 2018

Cousin, sibling or enemy?

Today Annie allowed young Jack onto her bed while she was in it. They are not quite touching, although Jack has taken possession of Annie's tail. Annie regards him as a bit of a pest but about the equivalent of a cousin. If she accepted him as a little brother she would allow him to cuddle up much closer and maybe even groom him. Perhaps it'll come to that over the next few weeks - or perhaps not.... After all they've only known each other for 10 days. She plays with him but spends most of the day watching he doesn't come any closer. He is tolerated. At home my daughter's tabby, Isabella, affectionately known as Fizzy Izzy by her staff, regards him with open hostility. He cowers when he sees her and she thinks nothing of giving him a good swipe to keep him in his place. It'll be many months, if ever, before she tolerates him in the same room. We hope that Isabella won't show signs of anxiety. In the past she has over-groomed and urinated on the curtains when she has been unhappy. If she does we will plug in a Feliway diffuser or put some Zylkene natural calming supplement in her food.